Everything you need to know about the dental care of your children

07/04/2020

A child's first teeth, which are called deciduous teeth, are just as important as our permanent teeth. Deciduous teeth are the first generation of teeth to appear in the mouth. 


A child's denture begins to appear around the 6th month after birth and is completed at the age of about 2 1/2 years. The new teeth are a total of twenty. Ten in the upper and ten in the lower jaw.

Are deciduous teeth important?

The importance of deciduous teeth is great for the proper development of the child's oral system, as well as for chewing food, communication and appearance. But their most important role is that they are absolutely necessary to maintain the space for the smooth rising of the permanent teeth.

For all these reasons, the notion that new teeth are not important because they are being replaced with new ones is completely wrong. If a child loses a new tooth, it can disrupt the space in the mouth and make it difficult for the adult tooth to grow. That's why timely dental care for your baby is essential.

The following practices will help you keep your child's teeth and gums healthy:

  • Wipe your baby's gums with a warm, damp cloth daily, even before the first teeth appear. This removes sugar from the gums and at the same time helps the baby get used to the feeling of teeth cleaning.

  • Do not put your baby or toddler to sleep by feeding it with a bottle. Milk and juice contain sugars that can cause tooth decay if left on overnight.

  • As the baby approaches the first year of its life, start giving it milk in a glass. The goal is to stop using bottles until its first birthday.

  • Help young children drink water from small cups between meals and drink juices or milk only as meals.

  • Once your baby grows its first teeth, it's a good idea to brush them twice a day with a special baby toothbrush. Use a small amount of fluoride toothpaste, no larger than a grain of rice. Children 3 to 6 years old can use pea-sized toothpaste.

  • Parents or guardians should brush their child's teeth until they learn to brush all their teeth thoroughly without assistance. Watch them to make sure they spit out the toothpaste.

  • Keep toothpaste away from children when not in use.

  • The first visit to the dentist should be within 6 months of the appearance of their first tooth or the age of 1 year, whichever occurs first.

  • Parents and guardians should not share food utensils with their child or try their pacifiers and baby bottles. Both of these actions can transmit bacteria that cause caries to the child.

The habit of proper dental care from infancy to adulthood can help a person keep their teeth and gums healthy forever.